Posts Tagged ‘Horsemanship Naturally’

We Must Progress!

  A Hot August Saturday Break Under a Tree

Who must progress?  Each in the horse and human team. Student, horse and teacher.  We all need to become calmer, braver and smarter, more coordinated, confident and athletic. We all need to progress to being better problem solvers, more aware, more able to see what we see, softer, more thoughtful, considerate and progressive! We need to blur the lines between who is teaching who and dwell in what is possible!

What is progress? Growth or development (dictionary.com) So that means we progress from wherever we are to somewhere else, a movement, in an appropriate increment,  toward a goal. It could mean progressing speed – doing something faster (extended trot) or slower (passage), distance – closer to you (cantering by your shoulder) or farther away from you (cantering at the end of your longest line) ,  or quality(more on this later.)

When should we progress?  Now.

Where? Wherever we are. Bring what you know with you!  Add to that or modify it.  Create excitement and interesting things right where you are.  This is where progressing our creativity from where it is to somewhere else comes in.  Here is where the impossible become possible.

Why? Because this is what keeps us all in this game! Because if we are not progressing we loose interest, horses become work and expensive.  When we are progressing it is a labor of love and money well spent!

How do we progress? Pay attention (Observe) to where you are now without judgement and keep track of your progress (compare)

Journal or at least keep a calendar where you can track your thoughts, the time you put in, your goals and then REMEMBER TO BE GRATEFUL FOR THE JOURNEY!

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Learning To Let Go

It’s quite a task for any human being~ Letting Go~ Especially when you are committed to a particular outcome. It’s a great life’s lesson, learning when to hold on tight and when to let go.  What will teach you quickly is a rope burn! The kind you get on your hands when you hold on too tight for too long.  Oh, it creates blisters and hurts for days! And all week as we look at the dreaded rope burn, we wonder, why did I not let go sooner?  I wish I let go sooner.

Learning to Let Go

It takes two beings to create a rope burn a real one right there on your hands or a metaphoric rope burn on your heart.  Some get burnt and burnt and burnt before they learn the valuable lesson taught to any young person trying to have their way with a horse who has another idea.  It’s easier for everyone if you can just let go and watch the proud pony come back on on her own.  And the reward is an indescribable sense of accomplishment.

Lessons Learned While Parenting From the Barn! (via parentingfromthebarn)

Added a photo!

Lessons Learned While Parenting From the Barn!  Lessons in Horsemanship learned Naturally from horses!  The best Pony in the world! We were out in the fields near the barn working on emotional fitness with two horses.  Our goal was to practice trot; canter and canter; gallop transitions going cross country. We set out from home together, the horses were fine.  We rounded the corner away from home and suddenly everything became scary, a hawk, the big grass cutting machine, the irrigation pond, … Read More

via parentingfromthebarn

Lessons Learned While Parenting From the Barn!

 Lessons in Horsemanship learned Naturally from horses! 

Heart of Gold
The best Pony in the world!

We were out in the fields near the barn working on emotional fitness with two horses. 

Our goal was to practice trot; canter and canter; gallop transitions going cross country. We set out from home together, the horses were fine.  We rounded the corner away from home and suddenly everything became scary, a hawk, the big grass cutting machine, the irrigation pond, deer, corn!  So the first time around we walked all the while feeling my chestnut Mare’s heart beating through the saddle! My young student a 14 year old girl who has been riding with me for 16 months was on the pony.  The pony who teaches all the lessons to this budding young horseman,  here at In the Company of Horses.  Her name is Heart of Gold, AKA Hearty or Heart for short.  

On the far side of the field, we needed to go between the woods and the corn field.  If you have done this before, you’ll know, the corn is tall in NJ in August!  There was space for us to get through with a bit of ducking under a couple of trees near the end.  We get through these trees and come out by the road on a lovely patch of grass between the corn and fence.  My 16.3 big red horse notices some large blue object in the neighbors trash and goes directly backward ~ fast.  Curiously,  Hearty and her student could walk around us to have a look for themselves.  And here was where I noticed the thoroughness of the lessons of the past 16 months were truly learned.  My young student who couldn’t wait to go practice her gallop; canter transitions, just waited.

 Wu Wei- (Chinese: “nonaction”), in Chinese Taoism, the principle of yielding to others as the most effective response to the
problems of human existence. That’s what she did. She just waited, not passive but  non aggressive. Wu-wei is thus regarded as the secret to human happiness,
for through “nonaction” all things can be accomplished. 

The proof: Next time around we trotted the whole thing, the third time, we practiced our gallop; canter transitions!